1812

Knife & Sheath by Jerry Eitnier (4/9/14)
Indiana gunmaker, Jerry Eitnier is a returning donor to the CLA fundraising auction. Jerry is no stranger to the muzzle loading sport and art. He has been involved for more than 40 years. He joined the National Muzzle Loading Association in 1973, and in 1987 he built his first longrifle. He became a charter member of the Contemporary Longrifle Association in 1991.  More...

Folding Knife by Scott Summerville (4/29/2014)
The folding knife is an authentic accoutrement for the period of the War of 1812. Citizens of the new United States did not always want to carry a hunting bag and longknife while strolling the rapidly expanding cities and crowded militia camps. Knifes like this 4" bladed folder were handy in the hunting bag or in the pocket for eating, cutting patches or tobacco, and everyday chores or social events.  More...

The "Five Ears Pouch" by T.C. Albert & Tim Crosby (6/22/14)
By 1814 even in the far west of the Illinois country the frontier was changing, even so, many blood feuds kindled by earlier mutual antagonisms between the Red and White neighbors still smoldered. Born in just such a place during just such a time, Colonel John Moredock, the celebrated Indian Hater, first sought revenge against the Indians responsible for massacring his mother and stepfather and kidnapping his siblings, but he didn't stop there. The legend goes on to tell how as a grown man, Moredock continued on the war path killing every Indian he could throughout the War of 1812 and beyond, that is until he nearly murdered his own sister who had been adopted and raised by the Indians that had captured her during that fateful raid. It was then that Moredock swore to never kill again.  More...

Double Hunting Pouch by William Smith (6/25/2014)
The hunting pouch is an icon of the American frontier. By the early 19th century pouches could show distinct regional variations, wide ranges in quality from home made to finest cordwainers work, and variations in size and shape based on use. This years auction presents a stunning range of bags and accoutrements.  More...

Maryellen Pratt and Joe Seabolt Hunting Bag and Horn Set (6/27/2014)
Maryellen Pratt lives in Adams County, Ohio with her husband Ian Pratt. Maryellen is a maker of premium hunting bags, knife sheaths, haversacks and sundry other items. She is meticulous in using period correct materials and techniques. And her careful antiquing processes are universally appreciated. Maryellen regularly conducts classes on the skills and methods of making pouches and advanced leather working at the Log Cabin Shop in Lodi, Ohio and other venues. Her products are regularly featured on the Contemporary Makers Blog, in American Traditions, and can be found in on the range at Friendship, carried by by re-enactors and in better contemporary collections.  More...

Chris Barker Hunting Pouch Set (7/3/14)
Chris Barker has donated a complete hunting rig. Chris designed the bag and constructed the rig, doing all of the leather work. We are proud to say the Chris is one of our repeat donors to the live auction.   More...

Pouch, Measure, Brush, Pick, & Bullet Board by Rich and Jeanne McDonald (7/10/14)
Rich and Jeanne McDonald are well known CLA Artists. Rich and Jeanne have been married over 29 years and live on a small farm in southern Ohio. They are part of the southern Ohio contingent contributing to this auction including Joe Seabolt and Maryellen Pratt.  More...

Bag & Horn Set by Donald & Tina Shaver (7/13/14)
CLA artists Donald and Tina Shaver handcrafted this circa 1810 to 1825 hunting pouch and horn set for the 2014 CLA fundraising auction. The pouch is a classic beaver tail pouch with a carved buffalo powder horn.  More...

Native American Style Bag by Robert Pawling (7/16/14)
Robert Pawling is a CLA artisan specializing in dyed porcupine quill embroidery of many kinds done on braintanned deerskins to produce 18th C. Northeast Native accoutrements.  More...

Southern Banded Horn with Hand Woven Strap by Ron Hess and Kris Polizzi (7/20/14)
This is a Southern style banded horn of the type that would have been carried by militia or volunteers from the southern States in the War of 1812. This charming powder horn has been created by Ron Hess and the fine hand woven strap donated by Kris Polizzi.  More...

Iron Mounted Elisha Bull Rifle by Roger Sells (7/25/14)
Roger Sells is a well known contemporary builder and is a regular at the Lake Cumberland CLA Mini Show and at the KRA Show held at the Museum of Appalachia. He is noted for extremely well-made iron mounted Appalachian rifles and great Hawken rifles.  More...

Frontiersman Sculpture by Joshua Shepherd (8/6/14)
Joshua Shepherd created this piece. Titled "The Frontiersman" it is 21" tall and made of hydrostone with a hand-applied finish. This is number 14 of a limited edition of 50. (In honor of 1814 and in keeping with the theme of the auction.)   More...

Southern Mountain Rifle by Marc Tornichio (8/6/14)
This early iron mounted Southern longrifle was created by Marc Tornichio This rifle is not a copy of any one rifle but incorporates the architecture and features of several early iron mounted rifles of the western Virginia/Carolina Appalachian area from the 1790 to 1810 period. It shows the quality workmanship of a trained and talented gunsmith from 200 years ago or today. Marc says, "The rifle has a lot of characteristics of the GB rifle with a touch of the MESDA gun." Wallace Gusler published an article on the "GB" rifle titled "A Fine Iron Mounted Rifle" in the September 2004 Muzzle Blasts. Wallace noted the step wrist architecture and fine workmanship, attributing the rifle to southwestern Virginia or eastern Tennessee circa 1790. Another picture of the rifle can be found on page 32 of the July 2012 American Tradition. The Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts (M.E.S.D.A.) in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, has another step wrist rifle with iron mountings and carving by an unknown maker often referred to as the MESDA rifle. Pictures of this rifle are published on page 109 of Longrifles of Virginia by James Butler, and on page 43 of the January 2012 American Tradition. This rifle exemplifies the early period of the iron mounted southern rifle, prior to 1810, still showing some Germanic and English details but also the functional elegance of an evolving trans-mountain culture with details like the captured lid iron box.   More...

An Iconic Southern Pistol in the Style of Elisha Bull by Mike Miller (8/12/14)
There are some antique flintlock arms that seem to epitomize a genre or "school" as well as capture the personality of the maker and the time and place in which it was created and used. The fine silver mounted "Death or Victory" pistol by Elisha Bull of Tennessee is just such a piece. Well known riflesmith Mike Miller of Paducah, Kentucky has graciously built and donated a near-bench copy of this famous pistol as one of the centerpieces for this year's CLA live auction.  More...




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